Marketing Myopia

Marketing Myopia

Forget everything you thought you new about your products and services! There is a good chance that, like most people in business, your goal has always been to sell, sell, and sell. Well, Theodore Levitt explains in detail why this is the wrong approach. Not only is it considered the wrong approach, but it’s one that will leave you behind as the field innovates and continues to move forward.

In the timeless classic, Marketing Myopia, which spawned from a 1960s article in the Harvard Business Review, of which Levitt was an editor at the time, will change the way you think about selling and marketing. He uses business examples you can relate to in order to guide you to the conclusion that selling and marketing are two different things and one is going to give your business more success than the other.

When it comes to selling, you are using a pushing approach in order to get people to buy more. With marketing you are using a pulling route in order to meet the needs of your customers. It is meeting the needs of your customers, both now and in the future, that will help sustain your business over the long haul and make it more successful along the way.

The last thing you want in your practice is to maintain too narrow a definition in your marketing and not see the possible threats and changes. This book is concise and offers the information you need to focus more on the right type of marketing and meeting your customer’s needs. From examples that focus on Hollywood movies to railroads and from DuPont to Corning, you will set this book down with a whole new outlook on what it means to market and meet your customers’ needs.

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Worked at Burleson Orthodontics. Attended University of Missouri–Kansas City. Lives in Kansas City, Missouri.

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